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Speedy Experiment – Lemon Volcano20/08/2020

I can’t say I’m a big fan of lemons. They’re just like oranges, but a more boring colour and with a horrible taste. But, like them or hate them, with a few simple ingredients, you can turn them into a lemon volcano! You don’t need time or a laboratory for this one; like the tremendous teabag rocket, the test takes less than ten minutes. Furthermore, it uses entirely household materials, so won’t harm the environment!

You will need:

  • A lemon – mine was quite an old one, which was good as it stopped me from wasting food.
  • A spoon
  • A knife (get a grown-up’s help for this one!)
  • Bicarbonate of Soda
  • A spare container; the second ramekin (little dish) in my photograph has a dash of washing-up liquid under the recommendation of another experimenter; however, I found that I didn’t need this.

The method:

1) Cut the two ends off of the lemon with the knife.

2) Use the spoon to core out some of the middle.

This should make a “bowl” shape like the image above.

3) Squeeze out the lemon juice from the lemon-ends into the spare container.

4) Add some bicarbonate of soda to your lemon-bowl.

The lemon juice will react with the soda and create an eruption. If your reaction is underwhelming, add a little of your spare lemon juice…

If you like, try testing the lemon volcano method with other citrus fruit. Does it work with lime? Orange? Grapefruit?

The science:

Bicarbonate of soda contains carbon – it’s in the name (bicarbonate) . When the citric acid in lemon juice reacts with the soda, those carbon dixoide atoms gain two oxygen atom companions each, and become carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is a gas, so that creates bubbles in the juice-and-soda – and because quite a lot of it is being produced, the lemon seems to erupt!

Speedy Experiment – Alien Goo05/08/2020

Alien goo. What is it? Why do aliens use it? When did aliens discover it? I can’t answer any of those questions, because as far as we know, alien goo doesn’t exist. But I can tell you how to make something a lot like it! This goo will magically change form before your very eyes. You don’t need time or a laboratory for this one; like the tremendous teabag rocket, the test takes less than ten minutes. Furthermore, it uses entirely household materials, so won’t harm the environment!

WARNING: This is an extremely messy experiment, especially if there are any excited children involved. Make sure you’re wearing clothes you don’t mind getting stained!

The alien goo ingredients:

  • Some water
  • As much cornflour or cornstarch as you can acquire
  • Some food colouring – I used orange.
  • A bowl
  • A measuring jug
  • Some newspaper to cover any surfaces

The alien goo method:

1) Measure out some water – perhaps 100ml – and pour that into the bowl.

2) Dry the jug, then add four times that amount in cornflour to the water.

The image below shows a mix with far too little cornflour. The original blueprint I uncovered from the crashed spaceship recipe I found specified a ratio of one part water to two parts cornflour; I’d recommend at least four parts cornflour. You can always add more water to balance it out.

3) Add seven or eight drops of food colouring.

4) Mix it all together and let if flow!

“Alien goo” is… strange. You can pick it up like a solid, roll it up into balls and shapes, but the moment you suspend it in the air, it seems to “melt” like a liquid.

 

Be warned – siblings seek this stuff out like they can smell it. Perhaps they’re aliens too…

The alien goo science:

This “alien goo” is a “non-Newtonian fluid”. Isaac Newton, who calculated loads about gravity, made a “law”  – that’s a prediction about physics – that liquids will always behave in a certain way. But, naturally, we’ve discovered more since he lived 400 years ago. One of the things we’ve discovered is liquids that don’t follow that law he made – alien goo being one of them. And because they don’t do what Newton said, they’re non-Newton-ian fluids!